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Page 22

18 Section I. Instructions to Bidders

the prices of their bids by submitting Bid modifications in accordance with this clause, or included in the original Bid submission.

E. Bid Opening and Evaluation

24. Bid Opening

24.1 The Procuring Entity will open the bids, including modifications made pursuant to ITB Clause 23, in the presence of the bidders’ representatives who choose to attend at the time and in the place specified in the BDS.

24.2 Envelopes marked “WITHDRAWAL” shall be opened and read out first. Bids for which an acceptable notice of withdrawal has been submitted pursuant to ITB Clause 23 shall not be opened.

24.3 The bidders’ names, the Bid prices, the total amount of each Bid and of any alternative Bid (if alternatives have been requested or permitted), any discounts, Bid modifications and withdrawals, the presence or absence of Bid Security, and such other details as the Procuring Entity may consider appropriate, will be announced by the Procuring Entity at the opening. No bid shall be rejected at bid opening except for the late bids pursuant to ITB Clause 22; Bids, and modifications, sent pursuant to ITB Clause 23 that are not opened and read out at bid opening will not be considered for further evaluation regardless of the circumstances. Late and withdrawn bids will be returned unopened to the bidders.

24.4 The Procuring Entity will prepare minutes of the Bid opening, including the information disclosed to those present in accordance with ITB Sub-Clause 24.3.

25. Process to Be Confidential

25.1 Information relating to the examination, clarification, evaluation, and comparison of bids and recommendations for the award of a contract shall not be disclosed to bidders or any other persons not officially concerned with such process until the award to the successful Bidder is notified of the award. Any effort by a Bidder to influence the Procuring Entity’s processing of bids or award decisions may result in the rejection of his Bid.

25.2 If, after notification of award, a bidder wishes to ascertain the grounds on which its bid was not selected, it should address its request to the Procuring Entity, who will provide written explanation. Any request for explanation from one bidder should relate only to its own bid; information about the bid of competitors will not be

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June 12, 2021


Page 11

OGP HANDBOOK 10

• Technology and innovation: Governments embrace the importance of providing citizens with open access to technology, the role of new technologies in driving innovation, and the many benefits of increasing its capacity. Technology and innovation cannot be a stand-alone principle but must support/advance the previous three principles.

• The SMART framework: Assisting participating governments in seeking effective, clear, and measurable commitments:

• Specific: The commitment precisely describes the problem it is trying to solve, the activities it comprises, and the expected outcomes.

• Measurable: It is possible to verify the fulfillment of the commitment.

• Answerable: The commitment clearly specifies the main agency responsible for implementation, the coordinating or supporting agencies where relevant, and if necessary, other civil society, multilateral, or private sector partners who have a role in implementing the commitment.

• Relevant: For each commitment, the action plan should explain its relevance to one or more of the open government principles outlined above (transparency, accountability, public participation, and technology and innovation).

• Time-bound: The commitment clearly states the date when it will be completed, as well as dates for milestones, benchmarks, and other potential deadlines.

4.1.2 Format and length

Experience has shown that action plans comprising 5-15 high-quality commitments spread over multiple themes are more effective than those with a large number of less ambitious commitments. In 2017, the Steering Committee strongly recommended that participating governments cap the number of commitments per action plan to 20, with a suggested maximum of five milestones per commitment, with the aim of incentivising more ambitious commitments.

Additional considerations when determining commitment format and length:

• Clarity: Action plans should be clear, succinct, and action-oriented, and should be written in plain language with minimal use of jargon or technical terms.

• Holistic: Governments are encouraged to apply a whole-of-government approach to the development and implementation of their commitments.

• Time-bound: All action plans should cover a two-year period, with the implementation period ending on 31 August of the second year. At minimum, each commitment should have yearly milestones, so that governments, civil society organizations, and the IRM have a common set of time-bound metrics to assess progress.

• Extension requirements: Commitments that will take longer than two years to implement are allowed as long as they are clearly cited in the country’s next action plan and include a two-year intermediate milestone.

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June 12, 2021


Page 9

  9  

suite of country and CSO nominations after the vetting process, the SC is responsible for ensuring regional diversity in the composition of the final candidate list that is put forth for voting to OGP stakeholders.   To be eligible to run for election countries must have the following:

1. Improved or maintained their eligibility score since submitting a letter of intent to join OGP; 2. Published all OGP required documents (action plans, self-assessment reports, etc.) within four months of the agreed deadlines; and 3. Acted in accordance with the Open Government Declaration.

In addition to the above requirements, current SC members running for reelection must have the following:

4. Provided financial support to OGP (except in cases of extreme financial hardship); and 5. Regularly attended and participated actively in SC meetings and subcommittee meetings.  

In the case of government representation, the SC should be comprised of a minimum of one and a maximum of four governments from each of the four regions (Africa, Americas, Asia and Europe). All OGP participating governments participate in the election of all government SC members. Each participating government has one vote. If there are insufficient candidates from each region to meet the regional quotas then the government with the next highest number of votes will join the SC, regardless of region. In the case of civil society representatives, the selection committee will consist of five members, including two current civil society members of the SC and three other members of the civil society community. The selection committee will assess and rank the candidates that respond to a call for nominations according to publicly available criteria that have been shared with the civil society community at the start of the rotation process. The selection committee will make recommendations for the new civil society SC members, to be endorsed by the full group of existing civil society SC members. After the civil society SC members approve the final list of proposed new members, the selection committee will present in writing an account of their process, deliberation, and choice to the broader community. The civil society chairs inform the SC at the same time of their choice. OGP STEERING COMMITTEE CHAIRS Composition: SC leadership is to be comprised of a revolving four-member co- chairmanship team, elected by the entire SC, including a lead government chair, a support (or incoming) government chair, and two civil society chairs. The support government chair assumes the role as lead chair during their second year, when a new support chair is to serve. The four chairs, who comprise the Governance and Leadership Subcommittee, should not supplant the role and influence of the other sub-committees. A civil society chair may not serve as the lead chair. The year following their chairing, the immediate

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June 12, 2021


Page 5

5 | P a g e

B. Corporate Governance Policies Procedures & Practices – 30%

9. Does your Public Body have a board approved Board Charter Please attach a copy of your Board Approved Charter.

a. If yes, is there a review of the charter on a periodic basis

i. If yes, please give detail in the table below:

DONE BY FREQUENCY OF REVIEW

APPROVED BY BOARD

Committee, Name: Other:

ii. If no, is there any work in progress to formulate a charter

10. Does your Public Body’s Board approved Charter comply with the principles of the PBCGF for Public Bodies

…………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………

13. What information is provided to the Board prior to Board meetings Please check all that apply.

i. Agenda ii. Minutes of previous meeting(s) iii. Management reports iv. Financial statements v. Items for Decision vi. Proposed Resolutions vii. Others, please specify …………………………………………………………………….…………………………

14. How far in advance of Board meetings is this information consistently circulated Please check one:

i. More than a week ii. 5 working days iii. At the meeting v. Other, please specify ……….…………………………………………………….…………………………………

15. Is the performance of the Chief Executive Officer appraised at least annually

i. By whom …………..…………………………………………………………………………………….……………. ii. Are there set performance standards Who sets them............................ iii. Who reviews these standards and how often ……………………………………………………………

………………...........................………………………………………………………………..…………………

YES/NO

YES/NO

YES/NO

YES/NO

11. Corporate Social Responsibility: a.Does your Public Body have a board approved Corporate Social Responsibility (CSR) policy YES/NO Please attach a copy of the CSR Policy.

12. Which Board members and/or senior executives are primarily charged with implementation and enforcement of corporate governance best practices, and why

YES/NO

YES/NO YES/NO

…………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………

YES/NO

iv. 3 working days

…………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………

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June 12, 2021


Page 205

Public Bodies Ministry of National Security

Firearm Licensing Authority

_____________________________________________________________________________________________

Public Bodies, FY 2021/22 Page 202 Ministry of Finance and the Public Service

Firearm Licensing Authority

Introduction The Firearm Licencing Authority (FLA) was established in 2006 under Section 26A of the

Firearms Act (the Act). Pursuant to Section 26B (1) of the Firearms Act, the Authority is

commissioned to execute functions including the following:

1. Receive and consider applications for firearm licences, certificate or permits;

2. Grant or renew firearm licences, certificate or permits;

3. Revoke firearm licences, certificates or permits granted under the Act;

4. Amend the terms of a firearm licence, certificate or permit;

5. Receive and investigate any complaint regarding a breach of a firearm licence, certificate

or permit.

Summary Corporate/Operational Plan

Over the next four (4) years the FLA intends to strengthen its reach and capacity to drive compliance and restore public trust and confidence. During 2021/22, FLA plans to improve service delivery and effectiveness by:

• Developing a Delinquent Tracker Alert System which will allow the FLA to locate delinquent licence holders (and by extension the licensed firearms) including those who intend to travel out of the country using international ports. This alert system will assist with driving compliance and reducing the delinquency rate among licenced holders. FLA will be able to share relevant information with other government entities to assist in locating these individuals for possible prosecution and/or seizure of firearm(s).

• Undertaking the development (70%) of an Enterprise Management System which will eventually advance FLA’s processes through technology and efficiency in its operations.

• Operationalising a new regional branch in St. Ann to allow convenient access to FLA’s services by the clients in nearby parishes.

The Authority forecasts an operating surplus of $160.34 million (2020/21: $28.60 million). The planned staff complement is 223 (2020/21: 181).

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June 12, 2021


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