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Part Two

Operations 2.1 CMI deliver educational training across three faculties. These are: The School of Marine and Professional Studies, School of Academics Studies, and the School of Advance Skills. 2.2 The Marine and Professional School focuses on the core seafarers STCW 95 IMO courses leading up to the level of captain, chief engineer and chief mate. The Academic School manages the Associate Degrees, Diplomas, Bachelors and Masters Degrees and spearheads general research based activities. The School of Advanced Skills concentrates on hands on competency based training to meet the needs of the growing shipping and logistics sectors including, alternative energy, engineering projects, business development, entrepreneurship and the Career Advancement Programme (CAP).

CMI did not conduct resource audit to ascertain impact of planned increased enrolment

2.3 Over the financial years 2010-11 to 2014-15, CMI enrolment increased by 105 per cent, moving from 1,090 to 2,236 students. This surpassed CMI’s target for enrolment of 1,424 (Table 1). However, CMI did not conduct a resource audit to inform management and other stakeholders of available resources and how to efficiently employ the resources for optimum maximization. Failure to conduct a resource audit does not allow for effective planning and can expose the institute to risk or unplanned expenditure.

2.4 The absence of the resource audit also resulted in difficulties meeting the stipulated classroom space despite CMI renting three additional classroom spaces at three locations at a cost of $5.54 million, to accommodate the excess intake, over the three year period (April 2012 to March 2015). Further, CMI did not provide the status of the current capacity of students the institution can accommodate. IMO guidelines2 indicate that class sizes should be limited to no more than 24 students in order to allow the instructor to give adequate attention to individual trainees. However, our audit revealed that the current class size ranged from a low of 38 to a high of 48 students. .

Table 1 CMI Student Enrollment (2010-11 to 2014-15)

SCHOOL 2014- 15

2013- 14

2012- 13

2011- 12

2010 - 11

Change Change (%)

Marine and Professional Studies 138 101 224 198 215 (77) -36% Academic Studies 1,741 1,244 1,043 871 725 1,016 140% Advance Skills 357 584 339 240 150 207 138%

Total 2,236 1,929 1,606 1,309 1,090 1,146 105% Source: AuGD compilation from CMI records

2 Model Course 7.03 (the Officer in Charge of a Navigational Watch 1999 Edition)

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June 09, 2021


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cent in 2011-12. Over the period, an average of 25 per cent of cadets enrolled made it to graduation, compared to 86 per cent projected in CMI’s Corporate Plan 2012-2015 (Table 6).

Table 6 – CMI Graduates as a percentage of total student enrollment

Enrollment Total Placement Drop- out

Not Placed Graduated Graduates as a percentage of enrolment

2007-08 63 42 17 4 29 46%

2008-09 94 69 11 14 14 15%

2009-10 111 58 10 43 21 19%

2010-11 74 44 - 30 27 36%

2011-12 96 34 1 61 20 20%

438 247 39 152 111 25%

2.17 CMI attributed placement issues to the lack of available berths. Despite CMI entering into partnership with five shipping companies to provide practical training to students; the agreement did not indicate how many students will be exposed to training by each shipping company. CMI pointed to their research which indicated that currently, there is a global shortage of 15,000 marine officers. However, CMI is unable to meet the demand due to its inability to meet class size restriction recommended by IMO, lack of technical and human resources needed to deliver STCW1987 compliant maritime education and training.

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June 09, 2021


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