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Page 48

December 2016 Page 48 of 104

as the Consumption Based Map and the Unsatisfied Basic Needs Maps (Appendices 14 and 15) reveal the geo-spatial characteristics of poverty in Jamaica. Spatial features of poverty also overlap with crime and violence particularly in urban areas in Kingston and St. Andrew (Moser and Holland 1997). Further, the poor are often found in areas susceptible to environmental shocks and stresses (PIOJ 2007, 3). Community driven poverty reduction strategic priorities will therefore facilitate localised responses to localised problems. Addressing current community-led initiatives will add value to a revamped poverty reduction focus through making interventions more sustainable; re-apportioning public/private poverty focus to strengthen multifaceted programmes with wealth and skills creation beyond basic public infrastructure; targeted funding and capacity building of CBOs; forming strategic partnerships for sustainability; and strengthening monitoring and evaluation (Moncrieffe 2013; Arcadis 2005; Gayle-Geddes et al. 2012; Mclean and Blake Lobban 2009; Henry-Lee 2001). Programming Priorities: Focus will be placed on building community infrastructure (physical, social and economic) to address poverty needs and create greater opportunities for improving standards of living and creating an enabling environment. Improving infrastructure for enhancing sustainable livelihoods, and addressing risk and resilience considerations in the context of environmental protection are imperative. Special emphasis will be placed on addressing the unique needs of poor and vulnerable rural and urban communities. The development and strengthening of community-based and other social organizations will be important to the effectiveness of the Poverty Reduction Programme at the community level. Level Three (3): National At the national level, the Government guides the prioritization, resource mobilization, effective coordination, monitoring and evaluation and institutional support to relevant organizations implementing and supporting the National Poverty Reduction Programme. Programming Priorities: The provision of technical support for institutional strengthening and effective management, monitoring and evaluation of the national (and sub-national) poverty reduction programming, research, resource mobilization and allocation, are prioritized at this level. The strengthening of key organizations to support the coordination and implementation of the Poverty Reduction Programme will be imperative. Knowledge and capacity building for MDAs and NGOs to facilitate sustainable poverty reduction outcomes will also be a key area for partnerships. This will have implications for improved effectiveness of programme management and programme outcomes.

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June 12, 2021


Page 9

NAME OF TAXPAYER TAX TYPE PERIOD

RETURN TAX

BALANCE

ESTIMATED ASSESSMENT

BALANCE

AUDITED ADJUSTED BALANCE

OUTSTANDING PENALTY

OUTSTANDING INTEREST

SURCHARGE BALANCE

RECOMMENDED FOR WRITE-OFF

(AS REFLECTED IN RAIS)

LIST OF TAXPAYERS APPROVED FOR ONE TIME WRITE-OFF OF UNCOLLECTIBLE TAX ARREARS REVENUE APPEALS DIVISION

AS AT DECEMBER 31, 2010

Digi Order Ltd CIT 31-Dec-04 $0.00 $2,731,742.27 $0.00 $0.00 $0.00 $1,365,871.14 $4,097,613.41 Digi Order Ltd CIT 31-Dec-06 $0.00 $4,717,058.69 $0.00 $0.00 $0.00 $2,358,529.34 $7,075,588.03 Donald Nembhard IIT 31-Dec-10 $0.00 $0.00 $537,281.42 $0.00 $0.00 $0.00 $537,281.42 Donald Patterson IIT 31-Dec-06 $0.00 $0.00 $203,916.25 $0.00 $0.00 $0.00 $203,916.25 Donald Vernon IIT 31-Dec-08 $0.00 $0.00 $3,084,075.12 $0.00 $376,795.21 $0.00 $3,460,870.33 Donovan Wignall IIT 31-Dec-08 $0.00 $0.00 $610,820.77 $0.00 $0.00 $0.00 $610,820.77 Dosmetic And Commercial Appliance Spares Limited IT 31-Dec-09 $0.00 $0.00 $1,399,121.03 $0.00 $1,003,123.83 $0.00 $2,402,244.86 Dosmetic And Commercial Appliance Spares Limited IT 31-Dec-10 $0.00 $0.00 $1,160,309.74 $0.00 $691,241.50 $0.00 $1,851,551.24 Dr. Charlesworth Roberts IIT 31-Dec-97 $0.00 $54,189.00 $0.00 $0.00 $0.00 $0.00 $54,189.00 Dr. Charlesworth Roberts IIT 31-Dec-98 $0.00 $63,564.00 $0.00 $0.00 $0.00 $0.00 $63,564.00 Dr. Charlesworth Roberts IIT 31-Dec-00 $0.00 $174,631.84 $0.00 $0.00 $0.00 $0.00 $174,631.84 Dr. Charlesworth Roberts IIT 31-Dec-01 $0.00 $182,616.00 $0.00 $0.00 $0.00 $0.00 $182,616.00 Dr. Michael A. James IIT 31-Dec-07 $0.00 $0.00 $1,578,934.52 $0.00 $1,105,876.40 $0.00 $2,684,810.92 Dr. William Aiken IIT 31-Dec-09 $0.00 $0.00 $1,644,838.67 $0.00 $0.00 $0.00 $1,644,838.67 Dr. William Aiken IIT 31-Dec-10 $0.00 $0.00 $2,511,641.14 $0.00 $0.00 $0.00 $2,511,641.14 Dwight Chai-Chang IIT 31-Dec-10 $0.00 $0.00 $739,446.20 $0.00 $0.00 $0.00 $739,446.20 Dwight Thompson IIT 31-Dec-02 $0.00 $44,088.25 $0.00 $0.00 $0.00 $0.00 $44,088.25 Dwight Thompson IIT 31-Dec-03 $0.00 $54,549.92 $0.00 $0.00 $0.00 $0.00 $54,549.92 Dwight Thompson IIT 31-Dec-04 $0.00 $66,148.06 $0.00 $0.00 $0.00 $0.00 $66,148.06 Dwight Thompson IIT 31-Dec-05 $0.00 $72,481.09 $0.00 $0.00 $0.00 $0.00 $72,481.09 Dwight Thompson IIT 31-Dec-06 $0.00 $71,180.40 $0.00 $0.00 $0.00 $0.00 $71,180.40 Dwight Thompson IIT 31-Dec-07 $0.00 $83,134.44 $0.00 $0.00 $0.00 $0.00 $83,134.44 Eaton Gabbadon IIT 31-Dec-05 $0.00 $0.00 $441,019.24 $0.00 $0.00 $220,509.62 $661,528.86 Eaton Gabbadon IIT 31-Dec-06 $0.00 $1,161,731.88 $0.00 $0.00 $0.00 $580,865.94 $1,742,597.82 Eaton Gabbadon IIT 31-Dec-07 $0.00 $2,134,135.62 $0.00 $0.00 $0.00 $1,067,067.81 $3,201,203.43 Economy Hotel PAYE 31-Dec-04 $0.00 $0.00 $293,242.32 $707,796.51 $920,111.99 $0.00 $1,921,150.82 Economy Hotel PAYE 31-Dec-05 $0.00 $0.00 $241,730.71 $870,892.74 $1,476,052.58 $0.00 $2,588,676.03 Elaine Rodney IIT 31-Dec-05 $0.00 $50,049.67 $0.00 $0.00 $0.00 $25,024.83 $75,074.50 Elaine Rodney IIT 31-Dec-06 $0.00 $28,906.67 $0.00 $0.00 $0.00 $14,453.33 $43,360.00 Elaine Rodney IIT 31-Dec-07 $0.00 $34,331.67 $0.00 $0.00 $0.00 $17,165.83 $51,497.50

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June 12, 2021


Page 13

h MUSLIM M A R R I A O ~ Acr

No. The Muslim MarriOgc Cerlificate Book (Section 10)

I

:&! msmagc

Counterfoil

Pariah

Husband3 namo and ago Dale and p k x of marripge

Ompatioa of Name of father Name of fatha HWbbandS huband and wifes name of h,,&and Dowry and

-Ebandq addrw "z:zd how payable andaddress -

% i * ..........................................

(U) .....................................................................

(i) ..................................................................... (U) .....................................................................

Signature of mprrioec Oficer

Signature of Witness:

.......................................... I, of , a marriage o h r under

the Act do haeby ccrti!~ ihat n marriage between,thc abovementioned pqieticl in accadnncc with the Ialamic law of mamago and the Muslim Mamage Act, wm entersd mto before me on the

day of ,19 . 19 . .......................................... ......................................................

Signalure of Marriage Officer

Siflolure of Registrar-Gmernl ......................................................

011 th0 day of s r h t i h w . :

Si-rc of M6rria#c O&er

8 3 . *R+stratim on the day of

I

.To be f+d in by Mlrri.go 0 5 n r Wbcn M a d by

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June 12, 2021


Page 14

Ministry of Finance and the Public Service Fiscal Policy Paper Interim Report September 2018 Page 14

Starchy Foods’ where higher prices were recorded for produce such as carrot, cabbage, lettuce,

string beans and irish potato. Also, of note was the 3.0% increase in the CPI for the division

‘Furnishings, Household Equipment and Routine Household Maintenance’ which was largely

driven by the class ‘Goods and Services for Routine Household Maintenance’. This movement

was due to the increase in the National Minimum Wage by approximately 13.0%. The only

division to record a decline in its index was ‘Housing, Water, Electricity, Gas and Other Fuels’

as the group ‘Electricity, Gas and Other Fuels’ recorded a 0.6% decline in its index reflecting a

fall in electricity rates.

Table 2B

Inflation for the calendar year up to end-August 2018 was 1.6%, and 1.9% for the fiscal year to

end-August 2018.

Exchange Rate

At end-August 2018, the selling rate of the US Dollar was J$137.01 = US$1.00, compared to

J$129.65 = US$1.00 at the end of August 2017. This 5.7% rate of depreciation was significantly

faster than the 1.6% 12-month depreciation at the similar point last year. The selling rate of the

US Dollar was J$130.39 = US$1.00 at the end of the first quarter of FY 2018/19, reflecting a rate

of depreciation of 3.5% for the quarter compared to a marginal appreciation for the

corresponding period of FY 2017/18. The uptick in the pace of depreciation for the June 2018

quarter is partly attributable to an increase in demand by agents seeking to reduce their foreign

currency liabilities in a context of buoyant Jamaica dollar liquidity and lower borrowing rates.

Jun 2017

Index

Aug 2017

Index

Dec 2017

Index

Mar 2018

Index

Jun 2018

Index

Jul 2018

Index

Aug 2018

Index

Monthly

%

change

for Aug

2018

FY 18/19:

Q1 (%

change)

Annual

%

change at

Jun 2018

Annual

%

change at

Aug 2018

FY 18/19

to Aug

2018 (%

change)

CY 2018

to Aug

2018

(%

change)

ALL DIVISIONS - ALL

ITEMS 241.2 243.4 248.7 248.1 248.0 250.4 252.8 0.9 0.0 2.8 3.9 1.9 1.6

1 Food and Non-Alcoholic

Beverages 300.0 305.5 313.6 308.2 308.7 311.5 316.6 1.6 0.2 2.9 3.6 2.7 1.0

2 Alcoholic Beverages and

Tobacco 304.1 306.4 310.8 312.5 313.0 313.1 313.3 0.1 0.2 2.9 2.3 0.3 0.8

3 Clothing and Footwear 236.6 237.4 240.1 241.2 242.4 242.8 243.1 0.1 0.5 2.5 2.4 0.8 1.2

4 Housing, Water,

Electricity, Gas and

Other Fuels 230.3 228.4 239.0 247.0 239.7 247.9 247.7 -0.1 -3.0 4.1 8.5 0.3 3.6

5 Furnishings, Household

Equipment and Routine

Household Maintenance

234.7 235.1 236.7 237.7 238.8 239.3 246.5 3.0 0.5 1.7 4.8 3.7 4.1

6 Health 146.3 146.7 147.6 147.8 148.8 149.0 149.0 0.0 0.7 1.7 1.6 0.8 0.9

7 Transport 207.4 207.9 210.0 210.0 213.4 215.2 215.3 0.0 1.6 2.9 3.6 2.5 2.5

8 Communication 66.9 66.9 67.1 67.1 67.1 67.1 67.1 0.0 0.0 0.3 0.3 0.0 0.0

9 Recreation and Culture 188.8 191.3 192.2 192.7 193.9 194.1 194.9 0.4 0.6 2.7 1.9 1.1 1.4

10 Education 190.3 190.3 194.4 195.4 195.4 195.4 195.4 0.0 0.0 2.7 2.7 0.0 0.5

11 Restaurants and

Accommodation Services 193.7 193.9 196.1 196.5 197.1 197.5 197.5 0.0 0.3 1.8 1.9 0.5 0.7

12 Miscellaneous Goods

and Services 230.5 231.0 232.5 235.0 235.8 236.1 236.4 0.1 0.3 2.3 2.4 0.6 1.7

All Jamaica ‘All Divisions’ and Division Indices and Movements

(Base period December 2006 = 100)

Source: STATIN

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June 11, 2021


Page 15

Page 15 of 61

Mr Speaker, with the help of UNICEF and USAID, the Ministry has established

over 60 Parent Places. We are on track to establish another 30 at the primary

level. The Parent Place is a centre with the necessary equipment and resources

for parents to meet and discuss parenting issues as well as to participate in

workshops on literacy, numeracy, homework strategies among other areas.

 The Ministry of Education invites the Churches to join forces with the National

Parenting Support Commission to assist parents in improving their child-rearing

skills.

 All of us in this House deserve a “cussing” that we still have not passed law

making it mandatory for a father’s name to be on every child’s birth certificate.

 Being a good parent is the supreme achievement of any mother or father. Can

our popular culture affirm and emphasize this

 Parents if you invest time, love, presence and discipline from the Early

Childhood level, you won’t likely have the brawls and disgrace like what took

place among girls at Santa Cruz Primary and Junior High last Friday.

 Make them read to you, even if your eyes are dark. Take them to Church and

Sunday or Sabbath School. Make sure they join the nearest library. And parents

try to never miss a parent-teachers meeting.

 Be very careful of which step-father or step-mother you bring in on your

children. Encourage your children to open a savings account. Feed them

porridge and an egg in the morning. Help them to develop a taste for locally

grown foods, which are better for them than fast food. Manners and good

behaviour are important, style and fashion less so. Even if your pocket is low,

these are things we all can do, because of who we are.

...
June 11, 2021


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